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This image was scanned from my private collection

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • INTRODUCTION
  • BOOK I:
    • Embroidery Stitches
    • Applique
    • Assisi
    • Beadwork
    • Blackwork
    • Braiding
    • Broderie Anglaise
    • Chenille Embroidery
    • Cross-stitch
    • Drawn Thread Work
    • Ecclesiastical Embroidery
    • Faggoting and Insertion Stitches
    • Hardanger Embroidery
    • Hedebo Embroidery
    • Huckaback Darning
    • Hungarian Point or Florentine Stitch
    • Initials
    • Ivory Embroidery
    • Laid Work
    • Mountmellick Work
    • Needleweaving
    • Needlework-Tapestry
    • Net Embroidery
    • Netting
    • Old English Crewel Embroidery
    • Patchwork
    • Punch Work
    • Quilting
    • Reticella or Cut Linen Work
    • Ribbon Work
    • Richelieu Embroidery
    • Shirring or Italian Smocking
    • Silk Shading
    • Smocking
    • Tambour Work
    • Venetian Embroidery
    • White Work
  • BOOK II:
    • Plain Sewing and Dress-making
    • Machining
    • Mending
  • BOOK III:
    • Knitting
  • BOOK IV:
    • Crochet
    • Hairpin Work
    • Tatting
  • BOOK V:
    • Soft Furnishings
    • Rugmaking
  • BOOK VI:
    • Lacemaking
  • INDEX

Title: Weldons Encyclopedia of Needlework
Author/Designer: Weldons Needlework Experts
Format/Publication Date: HC:1947(date is approximate - book was published without copyright date)
Publisher: The Waverly Book Co., Ltd., London, UK
Language: English
Page Count: 876
Book Dimensions(ht. x w.): 9 1/4" x 5 3/4"
ISBN: None

SUMMARY- I love these compendiums of disciplines both because it gives me an easy place to go to find basic information on a wide assortment I might not have more exclusive and in depth works on, and because it gives sort of a snapshot of what purveyors of craftwork think the public of the moment will be interested in. The tatting chapter in this one is about a dozen pages. It gives an illustrated tutorial - the illustrations showing how the stitch is supposed to look when it is added to the ring, and not the actual hand motions that get you there. You are given a handful of classic edgings and a couple of much wider edgings using only basic traditional technique. I would never have been able to figure out tatting using their tutorial. Their samples aren't blocked, so they don't show to best advantage. I was overall underwhelmed with this one, but of course, your mileage may vary.