Cover Image Property of Mills & Boon, Ltd.
This image property of Mills & Boon Ltd., London
TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • LIST OF PLATES
  • AUTHOR'S NOTE
  • INTRODUCTION
  • I. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
    • Preparing the Pattersn, Choosing Materials, Collecting Your Tools, Cutting Out, Stitching and Finishing, Stuffing, Enlarging and Reducing Patterns, Making a "Bit Box", Some useful Adresses
  • II. NOTES ON VARIOUS PARTS OF A DOLL
    • Making the Heads, Adding the Features, Choosing and Creating a Hair Style, Making Shoes and the Patterns for Them, Making Hats and the Patterns for them, Some General Notes to help you
  • III. "SPUR OF THE MOMENT" DOLLS
    • A Clown from a folded handkerchief, A Little Girl from a Skein of Wool, Glidng Paper Dolls,
  • IV. FLAT BASED DOLLS
    • The Village Gossips- Matilda, Ada, Emily; More Characters to try- Mammy, Monk, Wizard
  • V. DOLLS FROM BALLS
    • Constructing a Pentagon Ball, Baby, Mandarin, Japanese Lady, Little Old Woman, Rabbit Toothed Queen, Interchangeable Clown, Fat King Freddy
  • VI. FLUFFY WASHABLE DOLLS FOR THE VERY YOUNG
    • Baby Snowman, Eskimo Boy, Baby Bunting
  • VII. JUMPING JACKS
    • General Instructions, Cossack, Schoolgirl Terror, Drummer Boy, Clown, Father Christmas, Christmas Angel
  • VIII. STOCKINETTE DOLLS
    • Making the Bodies; Six Little Girls- Judy, Sally, Sue, Elizabeth, Jane, Pam; Baby Angel for the Christmas Tree; "Twinkle"- the little Star Fairy; Idea for a Piccaninny, Idea for an Oriental Child
  • IX. PAINTED CALICO DOLLS
    • General Instructions; Four Clowns- Bert, Algy, Joey, Toni; Little Girl: Meg
  • X. THE GOLLIWOG FAMILY
    • Making the Basic Bodies, Making the Faces, Dressing the Golliwog, Dressing the Girliwog, Dressing the Golliwoglet, Dressing the Girliwoglet
  • XI. SWING LEGGED FELT DOLLS
    • Making the Bodies, Jester, Knave of Hearts, Cowboy
  • XII. NOVELTY DOLLS
    • Double Ended Dolls: Witch and Fairy Princess; Two Faced Dolls: Coal Black Mammy; Dancing Partners: Giant Clown; Spineless Dolls: Wobbly Winnie; Jack-in-the-Box; Inanimate Objects: Bertiw the Beacon
  • XIII. CORSET AND SHOE LACE DOLLS
    • A Family for the Doll's House; Constructing the Basic Figure; Constructing the basic toddler figure; Constructing the basic littel girl figure; Mother; Father; Grannie; The Twins, Bunty and Billy; Theresa; the Baby; Ideas for making "dolls for the dolls"; Peggy; Piccaninny; The Ten Little Nigger Boys; Miniature Fairy Doll; Miniature Golliwogs; Dolls for the dolls' dolls!
  • XIV. WIRED FIGURES
    • The Christmas Crib, Making the wire frames, Young Shepherd, Old Shepherd, First King(Yellow skinned), Second King(brown skinned), Third King(white skinned), Joseph, Mary, Manger, The Baby, a Lamb
  • HOW HAS YOUR DOLL TURNED OUT?
  • THE PATTERNS

Title: Dolls and How To Make Them
Author: Margaret Hutchings
Publication Date: HC:1963
Publisher: Mills & Boon, Ltd., London
Page Count: 288
Book Dimensions(ht. x w.): 10" x 7 1/2"
ISBN: None

PATTERN RATING:Star Rating Patterns have to be enlarged, are not gridded, and do not have seam allowances or grainlines marked on the patterns. They use the old a-b-c method of marking. There is a wide variety of patterns here - I thought the section on shoes and hats near the front the most comprehensive I've seen. None of the dolls have more sophisticated hands than the common mitten hand with the fingers made with top-stitching, but the heads can get quite complex with raised features. There are some photos of some of the dolls (but not all) and well rendered illustrations of the rest.

INSTRUCTION RATING:Star Rating Instructions are broken down by body parts and there is lots of illustration throughout. Instructions are often referred to from other dolls like "Make exactly as for Jester, page 164..." so there's a lot of page flipping involved.

SUMMARY- I've loved Margaret Hutchings' work for years, so was eager to get my hands on this book when I came across it. Upon reading it, I had to keep reminding myself when this book was first published(before I was born), and that what offends my sensibilities now, wasn't offensive then. I've had people argue with me that "piccaninny" and "golliwog" and "Mammy" still aren't offensive, but I feel they pander to racial stereotypes that are derogatory. One of the few color plates are of the Golliwog family laughing over the illustration of themselves in one of Upton's famous books about the Golliwog. The "Ten Little N... Boys" turns out to have been a nursery rhyme that Ms. Hutchings printed with the instructions that reminds me a great deal of "Ten Little Indians" that I had to grow up with(yes, I'm part Cherokee). The dolls are all beautifully executed, but this isn't a book I think can ever be reprinted.