Cover Image Property of PUBLISHER
This image property of Publisher,
scanned from my private collection
TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Introduction
  • Materials + Tools
  • Basic Birdmaking Techniques
  • Surface Design Techniques for Wings
  • Making a Bird From Hand-dyed Fabrics
  • Assemblage on Stretched Canvas or Wood
  • Using Found Fabrics
  • More the Merrier: Make Multiples!
  • PROJECTS:
    • Bird in a Nest
    • Wren
    • Lark
    • Crow
    • Quail
    • Chick
    • Swan
    • Woodpecker
    • Penguin
    • Owl
    • Raptor
    • Wading Bird
    • Flamingo
    • Gull
    • Hen + Egg
    • Peacock
  • Gallery + Conversations with Bird Artists
  • Resources + Further Reading
  • Stitches
  • Patterns
  • Index

Title: The Artful Bird
Author: Abigail Patner Glassenberg
Publication Date: TPB:2010
Publisher: Interweave Press, Loveland, CO
Page Count: 160
Book Dimensions(ht. x w.): 9" x 8 1/2"
ISBN: 9781596682382

PATTERN RATING:Star Rating There is a neat variety of birds covered without going over (very) old territory - no Country Hens or Geese. No seamlines or grainline markings, and the old A-B-C method of marking. She gets an extra star for being very original while still making her birds recognizable for the species they represent. It could be tough to photocopy the patterns because of the way it's bound(you're likely to break the spine getting the page flat enough). The patterns appear to be full-size, and she uses freezer paper so that it can be ironed onto shifting fabrics.

INSTRUCTION RATING:Star Rating Instructions are pretty easy to follow and are laid out in numbered steps, with lots of photos taken from different angles of the bird so you can see what it looks like from all directions.

SUMMARY- When I saw this book I knew I had to have it. Bird patterns are rare(unless you want to make the afformentioned Country Hen or Goose), so an entire book dedicated to the subject? I was so there. And I was not disappointed! I imagine most designers stay away from birds because of the daunting creative hurdle of simulating feathers. Ms. Glassenberg does a great job overcoming that hurdle and giving several creative ways to make birds with a song in their feathery hearts. I was so so glad to run across this book.

Anyone with more information about this publication can contact me through My Contact Page.